Routines in a secondary classroom

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Robert Marzano suggests that 'it is simply not possible for a teacher to conduct instruction for children to work productively if they have no guidelines for how to behave, when to move about the room, and where to sit, or if they interrupt the teacher frequently and make whatever amount of noise pleases them.' (Marzano, 2003)  As you watch this video of classroom practice, consider how the teacher has established and continues to reinforce the following routines: Entry to the classroom Verbal feedback approaches Distribution and use of equipment Gaining pupils' attention Exit at the end of the lesson Whether you’re setting out with a new class and establishing routines or revisiting routines to help things run more smoothly, take some time to reflect on what the teacher has done, how they've done it, what they might have done differently, and how this might influence your own practice. References Marzano R (2003) Chapter 10: Classroom Manageme

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This Post Has One Comment

  1. R
    Roselle Davinia Smith

    The teacher greeted every student friendly at the door. Greeting at the door I can see is a great way to set your expectation from the moment they enter the door.
    However, I would say something different to the teacher in the video I would not greet every student with good afternoon. I feel that it is too time consuming instead I would tell students to collect books or have a go at the starter activity, make sure they have their equipment and planners on desks, follow guidelines and expectations of the school.

    I liked the exit routine of the teacher she made it clear to stand behind chairs in silence and dismissed each table one at the time.

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