Routines in a primary classroom

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Robert Marzano suggests that 'it is simply not possible for a teacher to conduct instruction for children to work productively if they have no guidelines for how to behave, when to move about the room, and where to sit, or if they interrupt the teacher frequently and make whatever amount of noise pleases them.' (Marzano, 2003)  As you watch this video of classroom practice from Queen’s Park Primary School, consider how the teacher has established: Routines for entry to the lesson Routines for transition between activities Routines for group work Whether you’re setting out with a new class and establishing routines or revisiting routines to help things run more smoothly, take some time to reflect on what the teacher has done, how they've done it, what they might have done differently, and how this might influence your own practice.   References Marzano R (2003) Chapter 10: Classroom Management. Available at: https://chca-oh.instructure.com/files/363

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Routines in a music classroom

Robert Marzano suggests that ‘it is simply not possible for a teacher to conduct instruction for children to work productively if they have no guidelines