Making marking manageable in Secondary English

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When it comes to providing high quality feedback, we need to ensure that we are teaching responsively - actively eliciting evidence about our pupils’ learning in order to inform and adapt our teaching to meet their needs (Black and Wiliam 1998). This responsive teaching approach can help to reduce the marking load for teachers as feedback takes place in a more immediate way. In this video, an English teacher shares her tips for new teachers about reducing the time spent marking including live marking, coding and  whole class feedback. As you watch this video interview, consider what the teacher says about: Using instant verbal feedback and marking in class Using coloured and numbered coding Providing whole class feedback to meet collective needs Spending time where it has most impact I do, we do, you do modelling approaches Whether you’re establishing ways of working for the first time or reviewing your feedback and marking approaches, take some time to reflect o

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This Post Has One Comment

  1. M
    Mr Rupert Ibbotson

    As a prospective English teacher, marking has been something that has appeared intimidating and daunting. Hearing the idea that not everything has to be marked, and that some other in-class techniques can actually be just as useful to overall learning, is really refreshing. I especially like the idea of peer feedback, so the teacher can explain and discuss reoccurring mistakes in an engaging and positive manner, offering the chance for questions to be asked and therefore discussed.

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