Creating a culture of high expectations in a secondary classroom

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A variety of research into teacher expectations reveals that they can affect the performance of students. Brattesani, Weinstein and Marshall (1984) claimed that teachers’ behaviour communicates their achievement expectations to their students and influences students’ own expectations and achievement as a result. Studies conducted by Rosenthal and Jacobson (1963) into teacher expectations of students concluded that teacher beliefs of what pupils are capable of can have a profound effect on their achievement. In this research, teachers were given inaccurate information about pupils' prior attainment (i.e. that some pupils had achieved highly in assessments when in reality they had not); as a result the teachers had higher expectations of the pupils, taught them differently, and the pupils made more progress than their peers.  Pupils who feel supported by their teachers are less likely to become alienated and disengaged from their work. Muller, Katz and Dance (1999) comment that

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This Post Has 6 Comments

  1. A
    Abul Kalam Aziz

    again, although this may not be relevant in my current context, the background research makes interesting reading and the video is useful for reflection.

  2. A
    Angela Murphy

    So true – believe and demand – support and challenge. That little research study speaks volumes! Enjoyed the video too. Thank you.

  3. M
    Mrs Sally Ann Wilcher

    As I embark on my headship of an all through SEMH provision, this is something that I will add to my reference section.

  4. D
    Diana Fabin Chandersy

    Very interesting 👌

  5. L
    Lydia Marsh

    Great use of questioning in the video. This research and video has highlighted how important it is to use questioning effectively to engage all pupils and to create a supportive classroom atmosphere

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